2 days ago
21,446 notes

mcish:

"the beatles were the best band to ever live" 

lol …. ok….the jonas brothers though? 

2 days ago
1,081,352 notes
3 days ago
305 notes

linkinpark:

@SteveAoki sent @M_Shinoda the #ALSIceBucketChallenge. Mike did it on stage last night, and has challenged @ChesterBe, #TimFerriss, @LisaLingstagram, and @AustinCarlile! #CarnivoresTour

3 days ago
228 notes

There’s lots of lesbian lit out there: Canon classics from the pre-Rubyfruit Jungle era

The Well of Loneliness by Radclyffe Hall. 1928. The mother of all lesbian classics. The story of Stephen Gordon and her “sexual inversion.” So ground-breaking that, due to its lesbian subject matter, it was banned upon its initial publication. I haven’t read it; it’s supposed to be a downer, but some people like it; a period piece for sure.

We Too Are Drifting by Gale Wilhelm. 1935. Subtitled “The Story of a Lesbian,” shocking in its time. FWIW, the blurb on the period cover says “Better than The Well of Loneliness." I read this a long time ago and vaguely remember being disappointed, but again, it’s a classic and YMMV.

The Friendly Young Ladies by Mary Renault. 1944. A witty romantic comedy of the bohemian set in 1930s England, reportedly written as a response to The Well of Loneliness and therefore may be best appreciated in that context. I haven’t read it; it’s supposed to be good.

The Price of Salt by Patricia Highsmith (aka Claire Morgan). 1952. Ahead of its time, this novel tells the story of a love affair between two women in the 1950s. This book was a powerfully formative one for me, and I have revisited it multiple times over the years. Recommended.

Desert of the Heart by Jane Rule. 1964. Later made into the movie Desert Hearts, about a love affair between two women in the late ’50s. Not action-packed, but thoughtful, well written, and a landmark in its time. Other lesbian-themed books by this author include This Is Not For You and After The Fire.

Patience and Sarah by Isabel Miller. 1972. A major classic. In this historical novel set in 1830s New England, two women defy their families and their community to make a life for themselves. I remember liking this one a lot.

May Sarton (1912-1995). A lesbian writer, perhaps better known for her poetry and journals, she published several fiction titles as well (not all lesbian-themed). I tried reading her once or twice and Did Not Like; however, lots of people swear by her, so there she is.

1 week ago
205,510 notes
2 weeks ago
322 notes

hear-meoutt:

“Live” pics of Mike Shinoda
↳ some live performances from 2000 - 2001

2 weeks ago
1,274 notes
2 weeks ago
9,430 notes

lipsredasroses:

feministdisney:

micdotcom:

This is the answer to Barbie you’ve waited for — from the company you’d least expect

Last year alone, Doc McStuffins items amassed $500 million in sales and, this year, the franchise could become the all-time best-selling doll based on an African-American character, according to industry experts who spoke with the New York Times.

Who makes this unlikely doll Follow micdotcom 

(Disney)

She is one of the best selling dolls of the year and she is one of Disney’s best selling characters. 

3 weeks ago
196,878 notes

buckbarrow:

do you ever have second-hand obsessions

like one of your friends is super obsessed with a thing so whenever you see something about it you’re like “YES THIS THING” but you’re not the one obsessed with it. they are. you know very little about this thing and yet it still excites you because it excites your friend

4 weeks ago
1,017 notes
Hey Chuck! Love your work. What advice would you give for young writers?

chuckpalahniuk:

Okay, long answer here.  A writer friend, Doug Coupland, recently told me about medical studies that suggest the final developmental changes in the human brain occur around the age of 31.  When asked, most people — for the rest of their lives, regardless of their actual age — will say they feel 31 years old.  I’d written for several years, but at 31 I wrote ‘Fight Club’ and that age seemed to allow me the peace to sit and concentrate.  A peace I didn’t have in my 20’s.  My advice is to live a rich, interesting life, practice writing if you want, but don’t beat yourself to produce your best work until after the age of 31.  Okay?  Okay.

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